Issues regarding teens and alcohol and ramifications of alcohol abuse

Risk Factors and Consequences Despite a minimum legal drinking age of 21, many young people in the United States consume alcohol.

Issues regarding teens and alcohol and ramifications of alcohol abuse

Risk Factors and Consequences Despite a minimum legal drinking age of 21, many young people in the United States consume alcohol.

Significant statistics regarding alcohol use in teens include that about half of junior high and senior high school students drink alcohol on a monthly basis, and 14% of . Researchers suggest that teens are more likely than adults to abuse alcohol because of the way the human brain develops. During adolescence, the teenage brain’s pleasure centers mature quicker than the part of the brain responsible for sound decision-making. Youth Drinking: Risk Factors and Consequences. Despite a minimum legal drinking age of 21, many young people in the United States consume pfmlures.com abuse alcohol by drinking frequently or by binge drinking--often defined as having five or more drinks* in a row.

The progression of drinking from use to abuse to dependence is associated with biological and psychosocial factors. This Alcohol Alert examines some of these factors that put youth at risk for drinking and for alcohol-related problems and considers some of the consequences of their drinking.

Prevalence of Youth Drinking Thirteen- to fifteen-year-olds are at high risk to begin drinking 3. According to results of an annual survey of students in 8th, 10th, and 12th grades, 26 percent of 8th graders, 40 percent of 10th graders, and 51 percent of 12th graders reported drinking alcohol within the past month 4.

Binge drinking at least once during the 2 weeks before the survey was reported by 16 percent of 8th graders, 25 percent of 10th graders, and 30 percent of 12th graders.

Males report higher rates of daily drinking and binge drinking than females, but these differences are diminishing 3.

White students report the highest levels of drinking, blacks report the lowest, and Hispanics fall between the two 3. A survey focusing on the alcohol-related problems experienced by 4, high school seniors and dropouts found that within the preceding year, approximately 80 percent reported either getting "drunk," binge drinking, or drinking and driving.

More than half said that drinking had caused them to feel sick, miss school or work, get arrested, or have a car crash 5. Some adolescents who drink later abuse alcohol and may develop alcoholism. Although these conditions are defined for adults in the DSM, research suggests that separate diagnostic criteria may be needed for youth 6.

Drinking and Adolescent Development While drinking may be a singular problem behavior for some, research suggests that for others it may be an expression of general adolescent turmoil that includes other problem behaviors and that these behaviors are linked to unconventionality, impulsiveness, and sensation seeking Binge drinking, often beginning around age 13, tends to increase during adolescence, peak in young adulthood agesthen gradually decrease.

In a national survey, binge drinking was reported by 28 percent of high school seniors, 41 percent of to year-olds, but only 25 percent of to year-olds 3, Individuals who increase their binge drinking from age 18 to 24 and those who consistently binge drink at least once a week during this period may have problems attaining the goals typical of the transition from adolescence to young adulthood e.

Children of alcoholics are significantly more likely than children of nonalcoholics to initiate drinking during adolescence 17 and to develop alcoholism 18but the relative influences of environment and genetics have not been determined and vary among people.

Issues regarding teens and alcohol and ramifications of alcohol abuse

Brain waves elicited in response to specific stimuli e. P, a wave that occurs about milliseconds after a stimulus, is most frequently used in this research. A low P amplitude has been demonstrated in individuals with increased risk for alcoholism, especially sons of alcoholic fathers 19, P measures among 36 preadolescent boys were able to predict alcohol and other drug AOD use 4 years later, at an average age of 16 Children classified as "undercontrolled" i.Significant statistics regarding alcohol use in teens include that about half of junior high and senior high school students drink alcohol on a monthly basis, and 14% of .

A substance abuse treatment program is defined as an individual or entity that provides alcohol or drug abuse diagnosis, treatment or referral. For the purposes of this document, the term “program” includes.

Jun 29,  · The study focused on alcohol dependence and also included questions about personality, family history of alcoholism, and other substance use. The . For example, in some States, a child living with a parent involved in extensive substance abuse, perhaps surrounded by a culture of drugs and alcohol, is not considered to be abused or neglected unless certain other conditions are met.

Researchers suggest that teens are more likely than adults to abuse alcohol because of the way the human brain develops. During adolescence, the teenage brain’s pleasure centers mature quicker than the part of the brain responsible for sound decision-making.

Engaging in drug or alcohol use can cause an abundance of issues for teens, from physical ailments to social isolation. But teen substance abuse is preventable. It is important for parents to spend time with their kids, talk to them about the dangers of drug use and teach them ways to avoid temptations to use.

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