Death of a salesman minor

She also chastises her sons for their selfish actions and lack of concern for Willy. Bernard is Biff's childhood friend and neighbor. As a child, Bernard was unathletic, but he studied Linda is Willy Loman's supportive wife, who compares her husband to a "little boat looking for a harbor.

Death of a salesman minor

The play is a montage of memories, dreams, confrontations, and arguments, all of which make up the last 24 hours of Willy Loman's life. The three major themes within the play are denial, contradiction, and order versus disorder.

Each member of the Loman family is living in denial or perpetuating a cycle of denial for others. Willy Loman is incapable of accepting the fact that he is a mediocre salesman. Instead Willy strives for his version of the American dream — success and notoriety — even if he is forced to deny reality in order to achieve it.

Instead of acknowledging that he is not a well-known success, Willy retreats into the past and chooses to relive past memories and events in which he is perceived as successful. For example, Willy's favorite memory is of Biff's last football game because Biff vows to make a touchdown just for him.

In this scene in the past, Willy can hardly wait to tell the story to his buyers. He considers himself famous as a result of his son's pride in him. Willy's sons, Biff and Happy, adopt Willy's habit of denying or manipulating reality and practice it all of their lives, much to their detriment.

It is only at the end of the play that Biff admits he has been a "phony" too, just like Willy. Linda is the only character that recognizes the Loman family lives in denial; however, she goes along with Willy's fantasies in order to preserve his fragile mental state.

The second major theme of the play is contradiction.

Get an answer for 'What are the roles of the minor characters in Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller?' and find homework help for other Death of a Salesman questions at eNotes. Related Questions. What is the role of the minor characters in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman? 1 educator answer What is the role of illusion versus reality in Death of a Salesman by Arthur. Get free homework help on Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman: play summary, summary and analysis, quotes, essays, and character analysis courtesy of CliffsNotes. Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman follows the story of Willy Loman, an aging and mediocre salesman who once cheated on his wife and lives in denial of the affair. Wife Linda and .

Throughout the play, Willy's behavior is riddled with inconsistencies. In fact, the only thing consistent about Willy is his inconsistency.

Death of a salesman minor

From the very beginning of Act I, Scene 1, Willy reveals this tendency. He labels Biff a "lazy bum" but then contradicts himself two lines later when he states, "And such a hard worker. There's one thing about Biff — he's not lazy. Willy's inconsistent behavior is the result of his inability to accept reality and his tendency to manipulate or re-create the past in an attempt to escape the present.

For example, Willy cannot resign himself to the fact that Biff no longer respects him because of Willy's affair. Rather than admit that their relationship is irreconcilable, Willy retreats to a previous time when Biff admired and respected him. As the play continues, Willy disassociates himself more and more from the present as his problems become too numerous to deal with.

The third major theme of the play, which is order versus disorder, results from Willy's retreats into the past. Each time Willy loses himself in the past, he does so in order to deny the present, especially if the present is too difficult to accept.

As the play progresses, Willy spends more and more time in the past as a means of reestablishing order in his life. The more fragmented and disastrous reality becomes, the more necessary it is for Willy to create an alternative reality, even if it requires him to live solely in the past.

This is demonstrated immediately after Willy is fired. Ben appears, and Willy confides "nothing's working out. I don't know what to do. Linda appears and convinces Willy that he should stay in sales, just like Dave Singleman.

Willy's confidence quickly resurfaces, and he is confident that he has made the right decision by turning down Ben's offer; he is certain he will be a success like Singleman.

Death of a Salesman – Minor Characters

Thus, Willy's memory has distracted him from the reality of losing his job. Denial, contradiction, and the quest for order versus disorder comprise the three major themes of Death of a Salesman.

All three themes work together to create a dreamlike atmosphere in which the audience watches a man's identity and mental stability slip away.

The play continues to affect audiences because it allows them to hold a mirror up to themselves.

Related Questions

Willy's self-deprecation, sense of failure, and overwhelming regret are emotions that an audience can relate to because everyone has experienced them at one time or another. Individuals continue to react to Death of a Salesman because Willy's situation is not unique: He made a mistake — a mistake that irrevocably changed his relationship with the people he loves most — and when all of his attempts to eradicate his mistake fail, he makes one grand attempt to correct the mistake.

Willy vehemently denies Biff's claim that they are both common, ordinary people, but ironically, it is the universality of the play which makes it so enduring.

Biff's statement, "I'm a dime a dozen, and so are you" is true after all.In the play Death of a Salesman, the plot is affected by three minor characters: Ben, Charley and Howard. The minor characters help the story's protagonist, Willy, develop extensively throughout the course of the play; therefore, they are key elements in the advancing story line.

Death of a Salesman, Miller's most famous work produced in , won a Pulitzer Prize and was made into a film in Death of a Salesman casts a cold eye on the American Dream and the moral compromises necessary to achieve it.

Minor Characters' Impact on Willy Loman in Arthur Miller's play, Death of a Salesman In the Arthur Miller play Death of a Salesman, Willy Loman comes in contact with several characters, many of whom prompt him to examine his past as well as his conscience.

Death of a Salesman - Wikipedia

Death of a Salesman – Minor Characters and nickel and dimed argumentative essay, punjab university thesis section. top academic essay ghostwriting sites for universitybest resume ghostwriters websites online. conflicts kill mockingbird essays, cheap dissertation chapter writing sites for university.

A list of all the characters in Death of a Salesman. The Death of a Salesman characters covered include: Willy Loman, Biff Loman, Linda Loman, Happy Loman, Charley, Bernard, Ben, The Woman, Howard Wagner, Stanley, Miss Forsythe and Letta, Jenny.

Death of a Salesman is a play written by American playwright Arthur Miller. It was the recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama and Tony Award for Best Play.

The play premiered on Broadway in February , running for performances.

What are the roles of the minor characters in Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller? | eNotes